From a Himalayan river to the shores of Australia


In eastern Nepal, a Himalayan River begins its long journey – meandering through hills and plains to eventually drain into the Indian Ocean. So who is to say the water from the Himalayan river hasn’t arrived on Australian shores? Even if it hasn’t, a song composed along the banks of one of the river definitely has.

The Tamur River holds an important significance for those from Nepal’s eastern hilly districts – the younger generation may have heard stories of the river from their elders, of them hiking their way to the plains of Nepal along its banks. ┬áThe beautiful walk along Tamur River has also inspired several people – take for example Amrit Gurung’s journey from Tehrathum to Taplejung in 1997. En route he picked up a folklore, and composed it into a song.

Saptakosi forms a natural boundary between Udayapur and Sunsari District. The Tamur River, along with other six Himalayan rivers form the Saptakosi.
Saptakosi forms a natural boundary between Udayapur and Sunsari District. The Tamur River, along with other six Himalayan rivers form the Saptakosi.

 

The song would be recorded in 2003 for Nepathya’s album ‘Bheda ko Oon Jasto’, and in 2020, the musical video would be released – along Australia’s blue coastline.

In the video, Amrit Gurung, lead singer of popular Nepali band Nepathya is seen walking along an Australian beach. As the water caresses his feet, the tune of the popular folklore takes us all the way to Tamur, where the song originated. One cannot help but wonder the possibility, what if, just like the tune, the water from Tamur River arrived at the shores of Australia too?